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Complexes: Pathways to the Soul – Ashok Bedi, MD, Jungian Analyst Saturday, January 29, 2022 │ 8:30am-4:00pm via Zoom | Convert Time Zone| 6 CEs

January 29

Complexes: Pathways to the Soul

Ashok Bedi, MD, Jungian Analyst

Saturday, January 29, 2022 │ 8:30am-4:00pm via Zoom | Convert Time Zone| 6 CEs

Complexes are the building blocks of the DNA of our Psyche. Embedded in the personal and the collective unconscious, they are the sand grit around which the oyster of our personality can gestate the pearls of new potentials. They help us harvest the gifts of the archetypes that form the nucleus of the complexes. The first to use the term complexes was Breuer, from whom both Jung and Freud borrowed the concept.  Jung established the experimental evidence for the complexes using his word association tests. This led to a transient collaboration between Jung and Freud and Freud established the centrality of the Oedipus complex as central dynamic of neurosis. This also led to the eventual breakup of their collaboration when Jung proposed that there are infinite complexes, and they may have an enriching impact on the personality if made conscious and assimilated in the Ego complex. Complexes are the foundation of the psyche and form the matrix in which the archetypes, alchemy, typology and individuation may blossom. Jung had his own complexes based on the word association tests – we will explore these as well.   A complex, well integrated with the ego complex leads to individuation, a complex at war with the ego complex leads to neurosis, a complex takeover of the personality leads to psychosis. Join me in exploring the mystery and the mastery of the complexes.

Suggested Reading

    – Jung, C. G. (1969). The structure and dynamics of the psyche, Volume 8 (2d — ed. Vol. 20). Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press., pages 92-106, paras 194-219

    – Jung, C. G. (1973). Experimental researches, Volume 2 (Vol. 20). Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, pages 439-482, 598-604

    – Dieckmann, H. (1999). Complexes : diagnosis and therapy in analytical psychology. Wilmette, IL: Chiron Publications.

    – Goodheart, W. B. (1980). A Review by Willaim B.Goodheart. The San Francisco Jung Institute Library Journal, 1(4), 1-39.

    – Hill, G. (1995). G. Hill, The Masculine and the Feminine.  Gareth Hill calls this dissolving action a “watery initiation.”   Boston: Shambhala.

    – Jacobi, J. (1945). Complex, archetype, symbol; Attempt to clarify terms from the standpoint of Jungian psychology. Schweiz Z Psychol Anwend, 4(3-4), 276-313. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20280402

    – Jung, C. G. (1960). The psychogenesis of mental disease, Volume 3 (Vol. 3). London: Paul.

    – Jung, C. G. (1969). The structure and dynamics of the psyche, Volume 8 (2d — ed. Vol. 20). Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.

    – Jung, C. G. (1973). Experimental researches, Volume 2 (Vol. 20). Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.

    – Perry, J. W. (1970). Emotions and Object Relations. Journal of Analytical Psychology, 15(1), 1-12a.

    – Psyche & the City: A Soul’s Guide to the Modern Metropolis (Analytical Psychology & Contemporary Culture) (2010). New Orleans, Louisiana: Spring Journal, Inc

    – Roesler, C. U., Tina van. (2018). Comlexes and the Unconscious. In C. Roesler (Ed.), Research in Analytical Psychology – Empirical Research (pp. 29-40). London and New York: Routledge – Taylor and Francis Group.

    – Shalit, E. (2002). The complex : path of transformation from archetype to ego. Toronto: Inner City Books.

    – Singer, T., & Kimbles, S. L. (2004). The cultural complex : contemporary Jungian perspectives on psyche and society. Hove, East Sussex ; New York: Brunner-Routledge.

Learning Objectives
After attending this class, you will be able to:

    1) Discuss Jung’s word association experiments;
2) Assess Jung’s formulation of the complexes;
3) Explain the relationship between the complex and the archetypes;
4) Compare the Jungian and the Freudian depiction of the Oedipus complex;
5) Analyze the concept of the Cultural complexes;
6) Demonstrate the clinical management of the complexes;
7) Critique Jung’s personal complexes.

LOCATION
Zoom
Link to attend will be sent by email 1 week before the program

FEE
$125 | $65 Students | 6 CEs ($15 Fee)

Member discounts are not available for this program

Registration closes 24 hours before the webinar (January 28, 2022, 8:30am)

Ashok Bedi, MD, D.P.M, R.C.P.S. (England), M.R.C.Psych. (Great Britain), F.A.P.A. is a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, a Diplomat Jungian psychoanalyst and a board-certified psychiatrist in Britain and USA. He is a member of the Royal College of psychiatrists of Great Britain, a diplomat in Psychological Medicine at the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of England, a Clinical Professor in Psychiatry at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee and a faculty member at the Analyst Training Program at the Carl G. Jung Institute of Chicago. He is Honorary Psychiatrist at the Aurora Psychiatric Hospital and the Aurora Health Care Network. Trained in Medicine, Psychiatry and Psychoanalysis in India, Great Britain and the US, he is interested in the emerging frontiers of Spirituality and Healing and the synapses of the Mind, Body, Soul and Spirit. He is author of the book, Path to the Soul, (Weiser Books, 2000), Awaken the Slumbering Goddess: The Latent Code of the Hindu Goddess Archetypes (Booksurge publishers 2007) and the coauthor of Retire Your Family Karma, (Nicholas-Hays, Inc. 2003) and the Spiritual Paradox of Addiction (Better Yourself Books, India 2017). These and his other upcoming publications can be previewed at his website pathtothesoul.com.

 

To Register – CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW

REGISTRATION

Details

Date:
January 29
Website:
www.pathtothesoul.com